Rosecroft Raceway

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Rosecroft Raceway

Rosecroft Raceway is a horse-racing track in Fort Washington, Maryland, United States. It opened in 1949, at Rosecroft Drive.

Saratoga Race Course

Saratoga Race Course is a horse-racing track in Saratoga Springs, New York, United States. It opened on August 3, 1863, and is the oldest organized sporting venue of any kind in the United States. It is typically open for racing from late July through early September.

History

Its other name is called “Raceway by the Beltway” for being close to Interstate 495, a harness racing track in Fort Washington, Maryland, opened on May 26, 1949. The track is the former WE Miller Stables situated next to the Rosecroft Stock Farm, where horses were bred. It is owned by William E. Miller, a horse trainer, and breeder. It is the first raceway managed by horse owners, horse trainers, and jockeys. The first night of racing was held on May 27, 1949, and became Prince George’s County’s political and social center.

The track’s ownership has been passed on from William E. Miller to his son John Miller (1954), then to Earle Brown (1969), in both reasons were due to death. In 1980, William E. Miller II assumed ownership of the track when Earle Brown changed its position in the track. Then in 1987, Mark Vogel purchased the track, a Maryland real estate agent. However, it failed to handle the racetrack properly and could not entice more players, hence the decrease in attendance. It is due to focusing more on his real estate business and neglecting its duty for the track. He even extracted money from the betting pools and utilized it for his real estate business. Then in 1990, he was arrested when cocaine was confiscated from him, and his company went into bankruptcy.

The following year (1991), the track was purchased by Weisman’s Colt Enterprises. However, in the same year, a fire broke out and ruined the grandstand and was reconstructed in 1993. In September 1994, Weisman’s family managed the track when he died from pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles. However, they could not afford to operate the track and only hoped to sell it. Cloverleaf purchased it but also attempted to sell it in the 2000s multiple times but to no avail. In mid-2002, several interested buyers emerged, yet the Cloverleaf was involved in lawsuits. Hence, it brought disappointments to the potential buyers and canceled their plans. Cloverleaf Enterprises filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in June 2009. Mark Vogel tried to purchase the track again, but a bankruptcy court judge denied the approval. Then in early June 2010, Cloverleaf filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and on July 1, 2010, the track was closed.

By 2011, the track was sold to Penn National Gaming. Then in 2012, a bill was introduced into the Maryland General Assembly, which authorizes a casino in Prince George’s County, signed by the Governor in August 2012 which was passed via referendum in November 2012. In May 2016, ownership of the track again changed when the Stronach Group (current owner) bought the track.

Track Details

The track is 5/8-mile long and has a 700-foot home stretch. The grandstand is 53,000 square feet, beside the 96,000 square foot, 3-story clubhouse, both winterized and glass-enclosed. The seating capacity for the grandstand is 9,000, while the clubhouse is 6,000. Inside the clubhouse is the terrace dining room, which can accommodate up to 1,100 people. Then each table in the dining room has its own television for simulcasting. It offers simulcasting year-round and live racing at night. The stables can house up to 1,200 horses, while the parking area can fit 5,800 vehicles.

History

Its other name is called “Raceway by the Beltway” for being close to Interstate 495, a harness racing track in Fort Washington, Maryland, opened on May 26, 1949. The track is the former WE Miller Stables situated next to the Rosecroft Stock Farm, where horses were bred. It is owned by William E. Miller, a horse trainer, and breeder. It is the first raceway managed by horse owners, horse trainers, and jockeys. The first night of racing was held on May 27, 1949, and became Prince George’s County’s political and social center.

The track’s ownership has been passed on from William E. Miller to his son John Miller (1954), then to Earle Brown (1969), in both reasons were due to death. In 1980, William E. Miller II assumed ownership of the track when Earle Brown changed its position in the track. Then in 1987, Mark Vogel purchased the track, a Maryland real estate agent. However, it failed to handle the racetrack properly and could not entice more players, hence the decrease in attendance. It is due to focusing more on his real estate business and neglecting its duty for the track. He even extracted money from the betting pools and utilized it for his real estate business. Then in 1990, he was arrested when cocaine was confiscated from him, and his company went into bankruptcy.

The following year (1991), the track was purchased by Weisman’s Colt Enterprises. However, in the same year, a fire broke out and ruined the grandstand and was reconstructed in 1993. In September 1994, Weisman’s family managed the track when he died from pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles. However, they could not afford to operate the track and only hoped to sell it. Cloverleaf purchased it but also attempted to sell it in the 2000s multiple times but to no avail. In mid-2002, several interested buyers emerged, yet the Cloverleaf was involved in lawsuits. Hence, it brought disappointments to the potential buyers and canceled their plans. Cloverleaf Enterprises filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in June 2009. Mark Vogel tried to purchase the track again, but a bankruptcy court judge denied the approval. Then in early June 2010, Cloverleaf filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and on July 1, 2010, the track was closed.

By 2011, the track was sold to Penn National Gaming. Then in 2012, a bill was introduced into the Maryland General Assembly, which authorizes a casino in Prince George’s County, signed by the Governor in August 2012 which was passed via referendum in November 2012. In May 2016, ownership of the track again changed when the Stronach Group (current owner) bought the track.

Track Details

The track is 5/8-mile long and has a 700-foot home stretch. The grandstand is 53,000 square feet, beside the 96,000 square foot, 3-story clubhouse, both winterized and glass-enclosed. The seating capacity for the grandstand is 9,000, while the clubhouse is 6,000. Inside the clubhouse is the terrace dining room, which can accommodate up to 1,100 people. Then each table in the dining room has its own television for simulcasting. It offers simulcasting year-round and live racing at night. The stables can house up to 1,200 horses, while the parking area can fit 5,800 vehicles.

History

John Hunter, who became the first chairman of The Jockey Club, and William R. Travers built Saratoga Race Course. The original track was built across Union Avenue from the present Saratoga Race Course at the current location of the Oklahoma Track (training track), which opened the following year. Since 1864 the track has been the site of the Travers Stakes, the oldest major thoroughbred horse race in the United States, which is the main draw of the annual summer race meeting. The Saratoga meet originally consisted of only four days, but over time was lengthened, and for many years, the meet lasted for four weeks. In the 1990’s it was lengthened to five weeks. Today it is a six-week meeting ending on Labor Day. In 2009, NYRA extended the 2010 racing meet by 4 days. From 1943 to 1945, racing was not held at Saratoga Race Course due to travel restrictions during the war. During those years, the stakes races that would have been run at Saratoga Race Course were contested at Belmont Park instead.

Saratoga Race Course has two well-known nicknames — The Spa (for the nearby mineral springs), and the “Graveyard of Champions” (for the upsets that have occurred there). Man o’ War suffered his only defeat in 21 starts while racing at Saratoga Race Course; Secretariat was defeated at Saratoga Race Course by Onion after winning the Triple Crown; and Gallant Fox was beaten by 100-1 long shot Jim Dandy in the 1930 Travers Stakes. In 1999, Saratoga Race Course was rated as Sports Illustrated’s #10 sports venue of the 20th Century.

As is the case with the other two tracks operated by the New York Racing Association – Aqueduct and Belmont Park – there are three separate tracks in the main course at Saratoga Race Course.

Contact

  • 6336 Rosecroft Dr, Fort Washington, MD 20744, United States

  • Phone: +1 301-567-4500

  • https://www.rosecroft.com/

Contact

Rosecroft Raceway

Don’t forget you can wager on the races with AmWager

Place Your Bet Now!

Wager on live horse races like a Pro with AmWager.